Monday, June 30, 2008

Open/Opened Revisited

The photo below was sent to me by a friend (thanks, Leonard).

‘This Upgraded market and Food Centre was declared opened by ...’.

Make it open, since it is an adjective here and not a passive verb form. (The opposite of open, however, is closed.)


10 comments:

anothercopywriter said...

Hi, TGT,

I wish to seek your advice to a question. But I don't see there's an email address to which I can send you a message. So, I thought I will just leave a comment.

I know the structure "Enter the king." (or the movie "Enter the Phoenix") is correct. In this case, the verb comes before the noun that does the action. But what is technical explanation to this structure, where the verb "Enter" is plural when "king", the doer of the action, is singular? Could you please enlighten me on this?

A recent example: http://myepaper.mypaper.sg/ebook/web_php/System/Zoom_In/Zoom_In_Page.html .

Thank you very much.

The Grammar Terrorist said...

Hi, anothercopywriter

Thanks for your question -- a tough one!

'Enter' in both examples is in the subjunctive: this is a base form which doesn't show tense (past/present) or number (singular/plural).

The subjunctive is not commonly used in English these days (except American English) and is regarded as formal and old-fashioned.

Some examples (subjunctive verbs in capitals):

"BE that as it may"
"We suggested that she COME tomorrow."
"He was not told of the accident, lest he SUFFER a mental breakdown."

And probably the closest to those you cite:

"PERISH the thought."

(Clearly, the verb "perish" cannot be an imperative since it is not a transitive verb; and neither is "enter" imperative in your examples.)

anothercopywriter said...

Hi, TGT,

Haha. I never thought I would ask a tough question. I'm flattered. Thank you very, very much for your advice.

Hope you don't mind, I have another question. I thought you may just be the right person I should ask. After all, how many linguistics expert can I ever encounter in Lion City?

My question: I have a keen interest in linguistics and I hope to pursue a master's deg in the subject. I did some research online and found out that the only local institution offering linguistics courses is RELC. What I thought silly was that one of the admission criteria is to have at least two years of teaching experience. But I'm not a teacher. Should I just try RELC, or don't even think about it? Are there other local institutions where I can fulfil my dream? Or do you think I should save up money to overseas (perhaps the UK) for that? By the way, my highest qualification is a bachelor's degree in mass comm, and I haven't
any formal training in linguistics. Hope I'm not deviating away from the main topic of your blog. Thanks again.

The Grammar Terrorist said...
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Anonymous said...

Hi Ludwig,

Does it mean the sentence "The newly open mall attracts many customers." is correct?

Ludwig Tan said...

Yes, it's correct, if you treat 'open' as an adjective.

I'd say 'opened' is also possible here, if you treat it as a passive verb.

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Ludwig Tan said...
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